© 2016 by musicaers 

Annual meetings

Digital Archaeological Heritage

This Symposium will give EAC members and others a welcome opportunity to explore exciting developments in digital technologies and consider how they may become embedded in general archaeological policy and practice over the next few years. It is hoped that a parallel ‘horizon-scanning’ event for UK post-graduate students researching digital heritage can be linked to the Symposium to allow the next generation of archaeologists to present their thoughts too.

A call to action for Europe’s archaeology was set out in the Amersfoort Agenda. It identifies digital technologies and the expanding phenomenon of social media as key aspects of the future of archaeological endeavour through its three key agenda items:
 

  • Use emerging digital technologies to share, connect and provide access to archaeological information; this will require improved collaboration and the development of (and participation in) European networks

  • Encourage cooperation with other disciplines and share data in order to create a shared benefit

  • Aim for the greatest possible access to digital archaeological resources for various user
     

groups and exploit digital databases to their full potential, including uses for the greater public.

The Symposium will last one and a half days (17-18 March) and will consist of three presentation sessions followed by discussions – including questions and comments from the floor:
 

Session 1 – Measuring and Sensing. The aim of this session is to explore developments in how we perceive, identify and characterize archaeological landscapes, sites and artefacts. From hyperspectral satellite imagery through Structure from Motion photographic techniques to sub-millimetric laser scanning, our capacity to use vast processing power to visualize archaeology has developed dramatically over the last 20 years and led directly to wonderful new discoveries even on very well studied sites.
 

Session 2 – Data to Knowledge. Information technology is unlocking the way we create information from raw data. We can now mine vast datasets to find associations, perceive patterns or serve up rich Geographic Information systems for national heritage protection or sophisticated research, and we are learning how to manage and curate these priceless archives and stores of knowledge. This session will explore new approaches being adopted by member states.
 

Session 3 – Visualising the past. This session will review the ways in which we can present archaeology to the wider public, ways which are developing at a breath-taking speed. 3D-printing, immersive technologies, Augmented Reality, and haptics are just a few examples of the remarkable advances which seem set to change the way people access and enjoy archaeological knowledge.

​17th annual meeting 

March 17-18, 2016

Brighton, UK

Downloads​

Brighton 2016

17th annual meeting

The pictures

 
Programme

DAY 1 (Thursday 17th March, 2016)
 

  • 14:00 – 14:10 Opening of the symposium, welcoming addresses

    (14:10 – 17:30) Session 1. Measuring and Sensing 

    The aim of this session is to explore developments in how we perceive, identify and characterize archaeological landscapes, sites and artefacts. From hyperspectral satellite imagery through Structure from Motion photographic techniques to sub-millimetric laser scanning, our capacity to use vast processing power to visualize archaeology has developed dramatically over the last 20 years and led directly to wonderful new discoveries even on very well studied sites.

    Session chair and moderator: Barney Sloane (UK)
     

  • 14.10-14.30    Lyn Wilson/James Hepher (Scotland, UK).  The Rae Project: Digital Documentation of a Nation’s Heritage

  • 14.30-14.50    Erwin Meylemans (Flanders, Belgium). It’s all in the pixels: high resolution remote sensing data and the mapping and analysis of the archaeological and historical landscape

  • 14.50-15.10    Sergiu Musteata (Moldova). Non-invasive archaeology in the Republic of Moldova - an example of multidisciplinary approach and international partnerships 

  • 15.10-15.30    Mark Dunkley (England, UK). Ultra-sonic research on submarine hulls 

  • 15.30-15.40     Questions & Answers

  • 15.40-16.10      Tea/Coffee Break

  • 16.10-16.30    David Bibby (Germany).
    Survey2 GIS - A flexible, open source solution for transferring survey data into GIS.
     

  • 16.30-16.50    Paul Bryan (England, UK). Historic Building Information Modelling

  • 16.50-17.10    Jaime Kaminski (Brighton University, UK). The ‘Near Lewes Hoard’: Capturing, visualising and presenting archaeological artefacts.

  • 17.10-17.30    Open discussion forum – led by a panel of the speakers who have given papers along with Questions & Answers

  • Close at 17.30 - Followed by visit to Brighton Pavilion museum


DAY 2 (Friday 18th March, 2016)
 

  • (9:00 – 12:30) Session 2. Data to Knowledge 

    Information technology is unlocking the way we create information from raw data. We can now mine vast datasets to find associations perceive patterns or serve up rich Geographic Information systems for national heritage protection or sophisticated research, and we are learning how to manage and curate these priceless archives and stores of knowledge. This session will explore new approaches being adopted by member states.

    Session chair and moderator: Keith May (UK)
     

  • 9.00-9.20    Agnieszka Oniszczuk (Poland). Archaeology in the GIS portal of the National Heritage Board of Poland

  • 9.20-9.40    Åsa M Larsson (Sweden). Digitalizing the Archaeological Process in Sweden

  • 9.40-10.00    Peter McKeague (Scotland, UK). Why the historic environment needs a Spatial Data infrastructure

  • 10.00-10.20    Máté Stibrányi (Hungary). Switching to digital tools. Archaeological heritage evaluation for preventive archaeology in Hungary
    10.20-10.30     Questions & Answers
     

  • 10.30-11.00      Tea/Coffee Break
     

  • 11.00-11.20    Hella Hollander (Netherlands). Saving Treasures: The DANS digital archive

  • 11.20-11.40    David Novák (Czech Republic). Archaeological Map of the Czech Republic – Current state and future visions of virtual research tools in Czech Republic

  • 11.40-12.00    Rudina Zoto (Albania). ASA: an Open Source WebGIS application for Albania

  • 12.00-12.20    Julian Richards (University of York, UK). Long term data preservation and re-use: the work of the Archaeology Data Service

  • 12.20-12.30     Questions & Answers 
     

  • 12:30 – 14:00     Lunch
     

  • (14:00 – 17:00) Session 3. Visualising the Past 
     

This session will review the ways in which we can present archaeology to the wider public, ways which are developing at a breath-taking speed. 3D-printing, immersive technologies, Augmented Reality, and haptics are just a few examples of the remarkable advances which seem set to change the way people access and enjoy archaeological knowledge.

Session chair and moderator: Hugh Corley (UK)

  • 14.00-14.20    Elena Korka (Greece).  New opportunities for access to cultural goods by the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports

  • 14.20-14.40    Elizabeth Jerem/ József Laszlovszky (Hungary). Recent Developments in the Application of New Digital Technologies in Archaeological Heritage Management in Hungary

  • 14.40-15.00    Jiri Unger/Petr Kvetina (Czech Republic). On-site presentation of the invisible prehistoric landscapes

  • 15.00-15.10        Questions & Answer
     

  • 15.10-15.40 -     Tea/Coffee Break
     

  • 15.40-16.00    Hans Blanchart (Brussels, Belgium). Archaeology and Geohistory: building a multi-user platform in the Brussels Capital Region

  • 16.00-16.20    Rob Shaw (Ireland). 3D Icons project, and 3D Icons Ireland

  • 16.20-16.40    Matej Ruttkay (Slovak Republic). Application of 3D Technology in Cultural Heritage in Slovakia 

  • 16.40-16.50    Questions & Answers
     

  • 16.50-17.00        Summation of Symposium 

  • 17:00     Close of the EAC Symposium